Timber framing is a centuries old method of construction found across Europe and Asia. While in North America the craft almost faded away during the latter half of the 19th Century, it has seen a revival in the last few decades. Timber Framing uses fewer and larger wooden members than modern light-frame, or stud construction, and fastens these members together through crafted joints held together by wooden pegs. Whereas light-frame construction is considered rough carpentry and hidden behind finished walls and ceilings, the craftsmanship of a timber frame is left exposed on the interior.

Timber framing is a centuries old method of construction found across Europe and Asia. While in North America the craft almost faded away during the latter half of the 19th Century, it has seen a revival in the last few decades. Timber Framing uses fewer and larger wooden members than modern light-frame, or stud construction, and fastens these members together through crafted joints held together by wooden pegs. Whereas light-frame construction is considered rough carpentry and hidden behind finished walls and ceilings, the craftsmanship of a timber frame is left exposed on the interior.

Timber framing is a centuries old method of construction found across Europe and Asia. While in North America the craft almost faded away during the latter half of the 19th Century, it has seen a revival in the last few decades. Timber Framing uses fewer and larger wooden members than modern light-frame, or stud construction, and fastens these members together through crafted joints held together by wooden pegs. Whereas light-frame construction is considered rough carpentry and hidden behind finished walls and ceilings, the craftsmanship of a timber frame is left exposed on the interior.

Arrow
Arrow
PlayPause
Slider